Project Team - USA

Mark Nichter, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Principal Investigator) is Regents Professor in the University of Arizona’s School of Anthropology and holds joint appointments in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and the College of Public Health. He has over thirty years of experience implementing a wide range of health-related research projects in Asia and is well known to the global health and to the tobacco control community. He served as Senior Health Social Science Field Advisor to the International Network of Clinical Epidemiology (INCLEN) for nearly twenty years. In this capacity, Dr. Nichter has coordinated and given technical assistance to scores of health-related projects in South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Africa. In the area of tobacco control, Dr. Nichter has carried out 21 years of continuous research on tobacco use in the US and Asia. He has served on the Institute of Medicine panel on nicotine addiction among youth and as a member of the Robert Wood Johnson-funded Tobacco Etiology Research Network (TERN) which investigated patterns of tobacco use leading to dependence. Dr. Nichter was a Co-Investigator in Project Reach (see below) - nichtermark@gmail.com

Mimi Nichter, Ph.D. (Co-Principal Investigator) is Professor in the University of Arizona School of Anthropology holding joint appointments in the College of Public Health and the Norton School of Family Studies and HumanDevelopment. For the past 15 years she has been actively involved in tobacco-related research both in the U.S. and in low and middle income years. For 5 years, she worked with the Tobacco Education Prevention and Cessation Program in Arizona, developing and implementing school-based prevention and cessation programs. She has also served as an evaluator on tobacco and other health-related projects both in the US and in South Asia. Dr. Mimi Nichter has been Co-Investigator on a number of NIH and Robert Wood Johnson-funded longitudinal research studies and has published on methodological and gender related issues in tobacco research. She was a Faculty Scholar with the Tobacco Etiology Research Network funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Nichter has extensive experience working in South and Southeast Asia on issues concerning gender and health and has served as a consultant for WHO, UNICEF, the Ford Foundation, and other agencies. She was a Co-Investigator on Project Reach (see below) - mimi.nichter@gmail.com

Myra L. Muramoto, M.D., M.P.H. (Co-Principal Investigator) is Professor of Family and Community Medicine and Public Health. She has two decades of experience in developing national and international training curriculum focused on tobacco, alcohol and other substance abuse prevention, screening, and treatment and currently teaches three web-based courses on alcohol and tobacco use in maternal and child health populations. Dr. Muramoto introduced tobacco cessation training into the University of Arizona (UA) College of Medicine’s required curriculum, and developed the first medical student and resident elective courses on tobacco cessation. She has a long track record in community-based research and outreach and has years of experience conducting training workshops for a wide range of professional and lay audiences. Dr Muramoto was the Principal Investigator of the NIH funded project Motivational Approach to Tobacco Cessation Brief Interventions - Project Reach (RO1-CA93957). This was the first large-scale, randomized, controlled trial of web-based and in-person tobacco cessation brief intervention (BI) training for non-medical “health influencers”. Reach curriculum emphasizes a supportive and motivational, tobacco user-centered approach to intervention.

Charla Dain, M.M. is an Administrative Assistant in the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. Over the past year, she has been instrumental in finalizing the educational modules for India and Indonesia, preparing them into a standardized format.

Ben McMahan, Ph.D, is responsible for building and maintaining the website for Project Quit Tobacco International.